In Cloud Firestore there are three write operations:

1) add

2) set

3) update

In the docs it says that using set(object, {merge: true}) will merge object with existing one.

The same happens when you use update(object) So what is the difference if any? It seems strange that google will duplicate logic.

Ответы (5)

The way I understood the difference:

  • set without merge will overwrite a document or create it if it doesn't exist yet

  • set with merge will update fields in the document or create it if it doesn't exists

  • update will update fields but will fail if the document doesn't exist

  • create will create the document but fail if the document already exists

There's also a difference in the kind of data you provide to set and update.

For set you always have to provide document-shaped data:

set(
  {a: {b: {c: true}}},
  {merge: true}
)

With update you can also use field paths for updating nested values:

update({
  'a.b.c': true
})

Per docs: https://firebase.google.com/docs/firestore/manage-data/add-data#update_fields_in_nested_objects

Dot notation allows you to update a single nested field without overwriting other nested field. If you update a nested field without dot notation, you will overwrite the entire map field.

As stated above, this replaces entire friends structure.

db.collection('users').doc('random-id').update({
    "friends": {
        "friend-uid-3": true
    }
})

This does not.

db.collection('users').doc('random-id').update({
    "friends.friend-uid-3": true
})

Another difference (extending Scarygami's answer) between "set with merge" and "update", is when working with a nested values.

if you have a document structured like this:

 {
   "friends": {
     "friend-uid-1": true,
     "friend-uid-2": true,
   }
 }

and want to add {"friend-uid-3" : true}

using this:

db.collection('users').doc('random-id').set({ "friends": { "friend-uid-3": true } },{merge:true})

will result in this data:

 {
   "friends": {
     "friend-uid-1": true,
     "friend-uid-2": true,
     "friend-uid-3": true
   }
 }

however update using this:

db.collection('users').doc('random-id').update({ "friends": { "friend-uid-3": true } })

will result in this data:

 `{
   "friends": {
     "friend-uid-3": true
   }
 }`

Further adding on to the answers above, if you want to delete nested fields in a map then you may want to use update or set depending on your use case.

If you start with the following and want to remove all profile entries other than "user1" then you have two options.

{
  "users": {
    "profiles": {
      "user1": ...,
      "user2": ...
    }
  }

Update

This will overwrite profiles with whatever is provided

update({
  'users.profiles': { 'user1': ... }
})

Set

This will merge the deletes into the existing profiles, leaving whatever wasn't deleted

set({
  users: {
    profiles: {
      'user2': FieldValue.delete(),
      'user3': FieldValue.delete(),
      ...
    }
  }
}, { merge: true })

This only applies to Maps because both set and update will overwrite arrays unless you explicitly use the array-specific operators such as arrayUnion.

One more interesting behaviour which can be useful but not obvious.

When you make batch update, and don't want to check if all documents you trying to update exist.

With batch update your request will fail if at least one document does not exist.

With batch set {merge: true} your request will successfully update all existing documents and create dummy documents for non existent ids.

Possible use case: Merging google analytics into your documents from analytics reporting api when this api provides data for existing and deleted documents together.

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